A Rusty Little Box

"C'est drôle la vie. Quand on est gosse, le temps n'en finit pas de se trainer, et puis du jour au lendemain on a comme ça 50 ans. Et l'enfance tout ce qui l'en reste ça tient dans une petite boite. Une petite boite rouillée."

katerpotater:

how do i get my lipstick to look like that? IS THAT PAINT?

Looks photoshopped I think, but you can get it done by using either a loose pigment like http://www.sephora.com/pure-pigments-P237507?skuId=1170778 or even a good powder eyeshadow in that colour overtop of a non-matte lipstick (matte lipstick won’t be sticky enough to hold the pigment, but don’t use gloss— just a normal satin finish should work).  Just make sure that you balm/exfoliate your lips well first, or they’ll look kinda gross.

katerpotater:

how do i get my lipstick to look like that? IS THAT PAINT?

Looks photoshopped I think, but you can get it done by using either a loose pigment like http://www.sephora.com/pure-pigments-P237507?skuId=1170778 or even a good powder eyeshadow in that colour overtop of a non-matte lipstick (matte lipstick won’t be sticky enough to hold the pigment, but don’t use gloss— just a normal satin finish should work).  Just make sure that you balm/exfoliate your lips well first, or they’ll look kinda gross.

givemeinternet:

A strong independent dog who don’t need no man

givemeinternet:

A strong independent dog who don’t need no man

(via katerpotater)

thepenguinpress:

Enter to win a copy of The Mockingbird Next Door: Life with Harper Lee by Marja Mills, this is a heartwarming read!
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee is one of the best loved novels of the twentieth century. But for the last fifty years, the novel’s celebrated author, Harper Lee, has said almost nothing on the record. Journalists have trekked to her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama, where Harper Lee, known to her friends as Nelle, has lived with her sister, Alice, for decades, trying and failing to get an interview with the author. But in 2001, the Lee sisters opened their door to Chicago Tribune journalist Marja Mills. It was the beginning of a long conversation—and a great friendship. In 2004, with the Lees’ blessing, Mills moved into the house next door to the sisters. She spent the next eighteen months there, sharing coffee at McDonalds and trips to the Laundromat with Nelle, feeding the ducks and going out for catfish supper with the sisters, and exploring all over lower Alabama with the Lees’ inner circle of friends. Nelle shared her love of history, literature, and the Southern way of life with Mills, as well as her keen sense of how journalism should be practiced. As the sisters decided to let Mills tell their story, Nelle helped make sure she was getting the story—and the South—right. Alice, the keeper of the Lee family history, shared the stories of their family. The Mockingbird Next Door is the story of Mills’s friendship with the Lee sisters. It is a testament to the great intelligence, sharp wit, and tremendous storytelling power of these two women, especially that of Nelle.
Mills was given a rare opportunity to know Nelle Harper Lee, to be part of the Lees’ life in Alabama, and to hear them reflect on their upbringing, their corner of the Deep South, how To Kill a Mockingbird affected their lives, and why Nelle Harper Lee chose to never write another novel.  
Enter to win here

I NEED to read this!

thepenguinpress:

Enter to win a copy of The Mockingbird Next Door: Life with Harper Lee by Marja Mills, this is a heartwarming read!

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee is one of the best loved novels of the twentieth century. But for the last fifty years, the novel’s celebrated author, Harper Lee, has said almost nothing on the record. Journalists have trekked to her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama, where Harper Lee, known to her friends as Nelle, has lived with her sister, Alice, for decades, trying and failing to get an interview with the author. But in 2001, the Lee sisters opened their door to Chicago Tribune journalist Marja Mills. It was the beginning of a long conversation—and a great friendship.
 
In 2004, with the Lees’ blessing, Mills moved into the house next door to the sisters. She spent the next eighteen months there, sharing coffee at McDonalds and trips to the Laundromat with Nelle, feeding the ducks and going out for catfish supper with the sisters, and exploring all over lower Alabama with the Lees’ inner circle of friends.
 
Nelle shared her love of history, literature, and the Southern way of life with Mills, as well as her keen sense of how journalism should be practiced. As the sisters decided to let Mills tell their story, Nelle helped make sure she was getting the story—and the South—right. Alice, the keeper of the Lee family history, shared the stories of their family.
 
The Mockingbird Next Door is the story of Mills’s friendship with the Lee sisters. It is a testament to the great intelligence, sharp wit, and tremendous storytelling power of these two women, especially that of Nelle.

Mills was given a rare opportunity to know Nelle Harper Lee, to be part of the Lees’ life in Alabama, and to hear them reflect on their upbringing, their corner of the Deep South, how To Kill a Mockingbird affected their lives, and why Nelle Harper Lee chose to never write another novel.  

Enter to win here

I NEED to read this!

nevver:

Pictures in boxes

Drunk and emotional

Listening to James Blake’s cover of A Case Of You hits me right in the emotion-balls.  Good night though!

Must Every YA Action Heroine Be Petite?

katerpotater:

lifeaquatic:

Yeah this drives me crazy.

This applies in the motorcycle world too. I’m a tall woman so I tend to steer clear of armored jackets because it’s next to impossible to look small and “feminine.” If I was a dude, I’d LOVE those bulked-up shoulders, but as much as I want to eschew gender norms, there’s something unshakeable about looking smaller. I’m getting better at ignoring this way of thinking, but it’s so ingrained in our culture that it’s still real tough to hack sometimes.

I haven’t read Divergent and don’t really care to, but

Divergent goes so far as to associate flab with low moral character: When Tris first meets her nemesis Jeanine, she wears a tight dress that reveals “a layer of pudge around her middle” and knees “crossed with stretch marks.” Of course the virtuous heroine is delicate and birdlike, while the unsympathetic villain has stretch marks.”

fills me with a rage that makes me want to read it so that I can write a goddamn thesis on how bullshit that is.  Hey guys, let’s blatantly villainize super common body stuff in a book marketed to tween girls!  May as well give her cellulite— EWWW, right?  Fuck, as if we don’t have enough internalized body and stature issues already.

(Source: titania522)

katerpotater:

eveningoutwithyourgirlfriend:

this will forever be my favorite tweet of all time

no but when you get drunk and accidentally start talking to your clueless date about white male privilege. 

Move to Toronto and we can date, because I’m happy to drunkenly talk about white privilege/male privilege/white male privilege all night long :)

katerpotater:

eveningoutwithyourgirlfriend:

this will forever be my favorite tweet of all time

no but when you get drunk and accidentally start talking to your clueless date about white male privilege. 

Move to Toronto and we can date, because I’m happy to drunkenly talk about white privilege/male privilege/white male privilege all night long :)

“The first draft is just you telling yourself the story.”

—   TERRY PRATCHETT (via phatalbert)

(via unabridgedchick)

lizlemming:

knitpearls:

lmnpnch:

Vanity Fair’s 2008 ‘Hitchcock Hollywood Portfolio’

I never tire of looking at these.

There’s fantastic video somewhere of Renee Z posing for this series. Just the most painfully awkward thing ever.

I would actually super be into a Hirsch/McAvoy Strangers On A Train and Knightley/Leigh Rebecca.  Totally forgot about this photo series, love it.